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PollutionEngineering June 2012 : Page 41

By ROY BIGHAM Need a pump? Here are some suggestions on how to pick the right one. 8.35 pounds per gallon. If the pump needs to lift or push water any height, that needs to be taken into consider-ation. Any elbows or curves in the pip-ing will have a negative impact on the pump's ability to move water and that needs to be considered. It is quickly evident that buying a pump is not just a matter or driving to Grainger’s and buy-ing a pump rated to move X gallons per minute of water. Science and engineer-ing is required to achieve success. the liquids that need to be moved? What volumes need to be moved? Are there solids included and, if so, what sizes? How fast do the liquids need to be moved? What power is available? Having the answers to these questions will get a start in the process and they should lead to more questions. Doing the legwork ahead of time will eliminate a lot of frustration. If the supplier does not have questions and just offers a line of pumps, keep searching. P umps can be a complicated topic. Using the wrong pump for an application can, at worst, cause a lot of dam-age or require lots of main-tenance time and money. But putting the right pump into an application can ensure everything flows along just right. What makes it so complicated? First, it is a matter of choice. I do not know how many types of pumps there are but Pollution Engineering lists 27 types of pumps in its online buyers guide. Consider the vari-ations in the types of fluids that have to be moved: common water, sludge, acids, bases, hot liquids, etc. Sometimes vast quantities of liquids need to be moved with huge pipes and other times, we need to dribble in small quantities to adjust conditions. Water is heavy at Steps to take Before hiring an engineer, or even call-ing a pump supplier, it is a good idea to have some basic informa-tion available. What are Experience I have used pumps from small chemical dosing systems to large dewatering sys-tems when we struck an artesian well and filled a landfill cell with two million gal-lons of water. It is true when they say, “size matters.” Take a look at the process to see if it can be altered to improve pump performance. For example, I noticed that Larger pumps, such as this one from Thompson Pumps, can provide their own power source and move large volumes of water where needed. See Pollution Engineering’s November 2010 products lineup. JUNE 2012 www.pollutionengineering.com 41

Pumps And Systems

Roy Bigham

Need a pump?<br /> <br /> Here are some suggestions on how to pick the right one.<br /> <br /> Pumps can be a complicated topic. Using the wrong pump for an application can, at worst, cause a lot of damage or require lots of maintenance time and money. But putting the right pump into an application can ensure everything flows along just right.<br /> <br /> What makes it so complicated?<br /> <br /> First, it is a matter of choice. I do not know how many types of pumps there are but Pollution Engineering lists 27 types of pumps in its online buyers guide.Consider the variations in the types of fluids that have to be moved: common water, sludge, acids, bases, hot liquids, etc. Sometimes vast quantities of liquids need to be moved with huge pipes and other times, we need to dribble in small quantities to adjust conditions.<br /> <br /> Water is heavy at 8. 35 pounds per gallon. If the pump needs to lift or push water any height, that needs to be taken into consideration.Any elbows or curves in the piping will have a negative impact on the pump's ability to move water and that needs to be considered. It is quickly evident that buying a pump is not just a matter or driving to Grainger’s and buying a pump rated to move X gallons per minute of water. Science and engineering is required to achieve success.<br /> <br /> Steps to take <br /> <br /> Before hiring an engineer, or even calling a pump supplier, it is a good idea to have some basic information available. What are The liquids that need to be moved? What volumes need to be moved? Are there solids included and, if so, what sizes?How fast do the liquids need to be moved? What power is available?<br /> <br /> Having the answers to these questions will get a start in the process and they should lead to more questions. Doing the legwork ahead of time will eliminate a lot of frustration. If the supplier does not have questions and just offers a line of pumps, keep searching.<br /> <br /> Experience <br /> <br /> I have used pumps from small chemical dosing systems to large dewatering systems when we struck an artesian well and filled a landfill cell with two million gallons of water. It is true when they say, “size matters.” <br /> <br /> Take a look at the process to see if it can be altered to improve pump performance.For example, I noticed that The maintenance man had acquired an impressive stock of supplies and spare parts when I took over operations. When I asked him why he needed such a huge supply, he explained that the liquids being pumped were saturated with calcium.In very short periods of time, the pumps would clog up.Constantly having to pull the pumps for repair, he needed to always have a completely built second pump ready to pop in while he made repairs with a hammer and chisel. That was hard on some of the parts.<br /> <br /> We were pumping the mixture into a tank where acid was added to remove the calcium. By moving the acid treatment system to before the pumping operation, we greatly increased their lifecycle between cleanings.<br /> <br /> Some of today’s pumps are much more than mere impellers and motors. They can include sensors to measure temperatures and pressures. They can have vibration monitors to signal when something is out of balance. They can even shut themselves down if needed. Suppliers are very helpful in providing any education needed to handle pumps and design systems. They will be very happy to provide assistance and, if one does not, then there are plenty of alternate suppliers to talk to.

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