POB October2010 : Page 21

Ultimately, it was this commitment, along with the team’s expertise and the use of appropriate technology, that led to the success of the project. Rolling with the Changes Following the archaeological discoveries in Port Angeles, the work there was dis-continued in December 2004, and the bridge replacement date was reset to 2009. Pontoon construction began offsite in 2006, and the bridge parts began arriving in January 2009 in Port Gamble Bay, where they were moored in preparation for con-struction work. The bridge was closed in May, and Parametrix began its survey work alongside the construction crews. Since the Hood Canal Bridge is a Above: Norm Brones, senior party chief, completes the mapping of a girder after placement. Right: Pontoons are floated out of Tacoma and headed to the pier in Seattle where the superstructure will be constructed. the floating pontoons were to be con-structed. Engineering documents that had been completed 20 years earlier during the west-half replacement were no longer adequate. WSDOT was fac-ing potentially huge claims from the contractor, and other large projects throughout the state were causing internal labor and resource short-ages. WSDOT began searching for a new way to deliver the project. “Layout of a superstructure is hallenging enough, but add to that Ultimatel tely, it was this commitment, along with the team’s expertise and the use of appropriate technology, that led ly, it was this commitment, along with the team’s expertise and the use of appropriate technology, that led to the success of the project. Rolling with the Changes Following the archaeological discoveries in Port Angeles, the work there was dis-continued in December 2004, and the bridge replacement date was reset to 2009. Pontoon construction began offsite in 2006, and the bridge parts began arriving in January 2009 in Port Gamble Bay, where they were moored in preparation for con-struction work. The bridge was closed in May, and Parametrix began its survey work alongside the construction crews. Since the Hood Canal Bridge is a Above: Norm Brones, senior party chief, completes the mapping of a girder after placement. Right: Pontoons are floated out of Tacoma and headed to the pier in Seattle where the superstructure will be constructed. the floating pontoons were to be con-structed. Engineering documents that had been completed 20 years earlier during the west-half replacement were no longer adequate. WSDOT was fac-ing potentially huge claims from the contractor, and other large projects throughout the state were causing internal labor and resource short-ages. WSDOT began searching for a new way to deliver the project. “Layout of a superstructure is hallenging enough, but add to that Although Although vital, the bridge hasn’t always been completely reliable. In 1979, a severe storm with wind gusts approaching 120 mph ely, it was this commitment, along with the team’s expertise and the use of appropriate technology, that led to th ately, it was this commitment, along with the team’s expertise and the use of appropriate technology, that led to the success of the project. Rolling with the Changes Following the archaeological discoveries in Port Angeles, the work there was dis-continued in December 2004, and the bridge replacement date was reset to 2009. Pontoon construction began offsite in 2006, and the bridge parts began arriving in January 2009 in Port Gamble Bay, where they were moored in preparation for con-struction work. The bridge was closed in May, and Parametrix began its survey work alongside the construction crews. Since the Hood Canal Bridge is a Above: Norm Brones, senior party chief, completes the mapping of a girder after placement. Right: Pontoons are floated out of Tacoma and headed to the pier in Seattle where the superstructure will be constructed. the floating pontoons were to be con-structed. Engineering documents that had been completed 20 years earlier during the west-half replacement were no longer adequate. WSDOT was fac-ing potentially huge claims from the contractor, and other large projects throughout the state were causing internal labor and resource short-ages. WSDOT began searching for a new way to deliver the project. “Layout of a superstructure is hallenging enough, but add to that Although vital, the bridge hasn’t always been completely reliable. In 1979, a severe storm with wind gusts approaching 120 mph storm storm with wind gusts approaching 120 mph caused the western half of the bridge to sink. The bridge was rebuilt and reopened to traffic in 1982. In 1997, the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) began working on replacing the east half of the structure, which was near the end of its useful structural life. In 2004, the project ground to a halt with the discovery of a 2,700-year-old Native American village and burial ground at the Port Angeles graving dock, where loating pontoon on tidal waters, luences from wind and waves, and the staged construction loading of the structures, and things quickly become more complicated,” says Norm Brones, senior party chief for Parametrix, a mul-tidisciplinary firm with engineering, plan-ning and environmental expertise. As one of a few local firms that could manage the survey of a floating superstructure, Parametrix was recruited to join the proj-ect team in 2005. The sheer magnitude of the project, combined with the need to have multiple teams at remote sites and build components on floating pontoons required clear expectations and goals for everyone involved. The team had to com-mit to resolving conflicts at the lowest possible level. Ultimatel Ultimatel timately, it was this commitm mately, it was this commitment, along with the team’s expertise and the use of appropriate technology, that led to the success of the project. Rolling with the Changes Following the archaeological discoveries in Port Angeles, the work there was dis-continued in December 2004, and the bridge replacement date was reset to 2009. Pontoon construction began offsite in 2006, and the bridge parts began arriving in January 2009 in Port Gamble Bay, where they were moored in preparation for con-struction work. The bridge was closed in May, and Parametrix began its survey work alongside the construction crews. Since the Hood Canal Bridge is a Above: Norm Brones, senior party chief, completes the mapping of a girder after placement. Right: Pontoons are floated out of Tacoma and headed to the pier in Seattle where the superstructure will be constructed. the floating pontoons were to be con-structed. Engineering documents that had been completed 20 years earlier during the west-half replacement were no longer adequate. WSDOT was fac-ing potentially huge claims from the contractor, and other large projects throughout the state were causing internal labor and resource short-ages. WSDOT began searching for a new way to deliver the project. “Layout of a superstructure is hallenging enough, but add to that Although vital, the bridge hasn’t always been completely reliable. In 1979, a severe storm with wind gusts approaching 120 mph storm with wind gusts approaching 120 mph caused the western half of the bridge to sink. The bridge was rebuilt and reopened to traffic in 1982. In 1997, the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) began working on replacing the east half of the structure, which was near the end of its useful structural life. In 2004, the project ground to a halt with the discovery of a 2,700-year-old Native American village and burial ground at the Port Angeles graving dock, where loating pontoon on tidal waters, luences from wind and waves, and the staged construction loading of the structures, and things quickly become more complicated,” says Norm Brones, senior party chief for Parametrix, a mul-tidisciplinary firm with engineering, plan-ning and environmental expertise. As one of a few local firms that could manage the survey of a floating superstructure, Parametrix was recruited to join the proj-ect team in 2005. The sheer magnitude of the project, combined with the need to have multiple teams at remote sites and build components on floating pontoons required clear expectations and goals for everyone involved. The team had to com-mit to resolving conflicts at the lowest possible level. more more c senior tidiscip ning an floating structure, standard survey proce-dures could not be implemented. Instead, the team had to use specialized survey equipment that established its own work plane and create an XYZ coordinate sys-tem within the plane. “Because the pon-toons moved with the tides, waves, boat wakes and wind, the instrument could not remain level,” Brones explains. “The superstructure was built ‘perpendicular and parallel’ to the work plane rather than ‘plumb and level’ to the world. To sim-plify the coordinate system, the X-value used stationing, the Y-value was 10,000 feet at centerline, and the Z-value was the distance above the pontoon bottom with 1,000 feet added so that even the anchor positions were positive values.” Led by Brones, the survey team laid out the elements of each structure. Each pontoon was 60 feet wide by 300 feet long. These pontoons were then joined lengthwise in groups of three, creating a single 900-foot assembly. Two of these 900-foot assemblies were built along with a third 400-foot section comprising eight pontoon pieces that formed the floating drawspan. Once the pontoons were assembled, the superstructure construction began. Layout included columns, girder pads, girders, decking, rails for concrete pav-ing—essentially everything needed to con-struct a 2,000-foot-long elevated roadway in three sections. Precise dimensional control was critical to the assembly of the components—a requirement that quickly www.rpls.com | Point of Beginning | OCTOBER 2010 21

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